Working With Foreign Image Files (CLI)

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This chapter contains information about working with physical images that were created using foreign or external authoring packages - programs other than GEAR. This chapter contains the following sections:

  • About External Images
  • Writing an External Image to CD/DVD
  • Additional External Image Information


About External Images

An external image refers to a physical image file you have created using GEAR or another authoring or formatting package, such as CD-I, 3DO, or Video CD. Usually there is a separate physical image file for every track. You cannot edit the contents of an external image in GEAR, however, you can take it `as is' and use GEAR to write it to a CD-R disc or a pre-master tape.

Writing an External Image to CD/DVD

To write a foreign physical track image to a CD-R disc, type: writecd -ext You can specify the type and the name of an external physical track image file or a so-called `track list file', which is a text file containing a list of track image files. is a numerical value indicating the type of image file. Possible values for are listed below. For track list files type should always be `12'. CD-ROM mode 1 (ISO etc.), sector size 2048. Standard ISO. CD-ROM mode 1 (ISO etc.), sector size 2352. Standard ISO with EDC/ECC codes CD-ROM mode 1 (ISO etc.), sector size 2352, scrambled sectors with 2 seconds pre-gap. ISO with EDC/ECC codes, pre-gap and scrambled CD-ROM XA mode 2, sector size 2336. Standard XA CD-ROM XA mode 2, sector size 2352. Standard XA with EDC/ECC codes CD-ROM XA mode 2, sector size 2352, scrambled sectors with 2 seconds pre-gap. XA with EDC/ECC codes, pre-gap and scrambled CD-I mode 2, sector size 2336 Standard CD-I without EDC/ECC codes. CD-I mode 2, sector size 2352 Standard CD-I with EDC/ECC codes. CD-I mode 2, sector size 2352 with 2 seconds pre-gap. Standard CD-I with pre-gap, EDC/ECC CD-I mode 2, sector size 2352, scramble sectors with 2 seconds pre-gap. CD-I with EDC/ECC codes, pre-gap and scrambled; uses the same output format as most CD-I authoring tools Standard CD digital audio Red Book audio (44.1kHz, 16 bit, stereo). Use file name as a track list file (). You can specify more than one track in a track list file. 20) DVD image (DVD-ROM or DVD-Video), sector size 2048. Please view the description of the WRITECD command in the GEAR command reference chapter, for more information on foreign images and track list files. You can specify the number of copies of the image you want create with the NrOfCopiesToWrite parameter, that can be set with the setcdrparms command. If a GEAR-supported medium changer is connected to the same SCSI bus as the CD recorder, GEAR uses the medium changer to change discs and automatically write multiple copies. Otherwise, GEAR prompts you to insert another blank disc as needed to write another copy.

Using a Track List File

You can use Type 12 to specify more than one track in a track list file. A track list file is a plain text file that contains one or more lines, where each line represents a track on your CD to write. For example, to write a mixed mode image with one ISO and three audio tracks, you might enter the following 4 lines in a track list file: image.dat ISO audio.2 DA +P:150 (This means there is already 2 second gap in the file) audio.3 DA -P:225 (This will add 3 seconds gap before the file begins) audio.4 DA -P:0 (This will record no gap between tracks) Support for Audio Files Apart from loading audio files into a virtual audio track with GEAR, you can also use audio files directly as a physical track image. GEAR supports Red book and WAV audio files as physical track images. You can use Type 11 for a standard Redbook audio file that does not have headers. You can create such a file with the readtrack command of GEAR from an audio track on an existing audio CD. If the audio file has headers (like WAV files), you have to create a track list file and use the option OB:44 to skip the header (assuming it is at the beginning of the audio file): audio.wav DA OB:44 (This will skip the wave header of 44 bytes) WAVE files are usually in LSB format, but most Unix systems use the MSB format. If you are using a wave file as an external audio track image your system must be LSB. However, if you load a WAVE file into a virtual audio track created with the NEWTK command, GEAR will correct automatically for the MSB/LSB difference. Any audio file must comply with the CD Audio (Redbook) standard. Keep in mind the following points: The samples must be PCM audio. The sampling frequency must be 44.1 kHz. Audio must be stereo. Each sample must consist of 16 bits. The byte order must match byte order of the computer you are using to run GEAR, unless you are loading a WAVE file into a vitual audio track.

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